Online dating why it fails


online dating why it fails-27

The pursuit of leisure cost more than most single working-class women (paid a fraction of what men were) could readily afford.

Weigel quotes a 1915 report by a New York social worker: “The acceptance on the part of the girl of almost any invitation needs little explanation, when one realizes that she often goes pleasureless unless she accepts ‘free treats.’ ” To have fun, a woman had to let a man pay for her and suffer the resultant damage to her reputation.

They’re a staple of Jane Austen novels: John Willoughby, who caddishly breaks Marianne’s heart in “Sense and Sensibility”; George Wickham, who reels in both Lizzy and Lydia Bennett in “Pride and Prejudice”; Frank Churchill, in “Emma,” who flirts with Miss Woodhouse while being secretly engaged to her frenemy, Jane Fairfax. As a twenty-first-century guy living in one of the most culturally liberal of American cities, he had options available to him that men in Regency England did not.

He could have chosen to be a player, sleeping around with abandon, or the kind of cheater who supplements monogamy with a series of flings.

The first is that though dating is passed off as a leisure activity, it really is a lot of work, particularly for women.